Hand chart for the Big Five personality dimension Conscientiousness (2016) Hand chart for the Big Five personality dimension Extraversion (2016) Hand chart for the Big Five personality dimension Neuroticism (2016) Hand chart for hypercalcemia (1971) Hand chart for arthrogryposis (1981) Hand chart for cri-du-chat syndrome - Hautleistenfibel (1981) Hand chart for Down syndrome (2011) Hand chart for Edwards syndrome (1981) Hand chart for fragile-X syndrome (2014) Hand chart for Holt-Oram syndrome (1981) Hand chart for Kabuki syndrome (A. Chudley) Hand chart for Klinefelter syndrome (A. Rodewald & H. Zankl, 1981) Hand chart for Cornelia de Lange syndrome (A. Rodewald & H. Zankl, 1981) Hand chart for Patau syndrome (1981) Hand chart for Prader-Willi syndrome (1971) Hand chart for rubella syndrome (1971) Hand chart for Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (1971) Hand chart for Turner syndrome - Hautleistenfibel (1981) Hand chart for Williams syndrome (R. Rodewald, 1994) Hand chart for Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (B. Schaumann & M. Alter, 1976) Hand chart for XXYY syndrome (1971) Hand chart for XYY syndrome (1971) Hand chart for 18p- syndrome, a.ka. de Grouchy syndrome 1 (1981)

- Some of the available hand charts are displayed above - you can use the displayed pictures above for browsing -


Publication: november 8, 2015

Hand Charts for Kabuki syndrome!

Kabuki makeup syndrome (KMS) is a pediatric congenital disorder featured with multiple congenital anomalies and intellectual disabilities.

Prevalence: quite rare, affecting roughly one in 32,000 births.

Two hand charts are available for Kabuki syndrome describing the significance of fingertip pads (persisting volar pads) often combined with various typical dermatoglyphic features plus a single interphalangeal crease- and/or short pinky fingers - see pictures below.


NOTICE: Individual hand features described below should not get associated in isolation with any theme; only combinations involving multiple hand levels have potential for diagnostic purposes.

Hand chart for Kabuki syndrome (A. Chudley). QUOTE: "This illustration shows the various landmarks related to dermatoglyphics and some common patterns or formations. In Kabuki syndrome, there are at least five commonly seen changes: (1) increase in ulnar loops (2) absense of the c-triradius or d-triradius - region highlighted with asterix (3) increase in hypothenar patterns (4) single flexion crease in 5th digit (5) prominent fingerpads (not shown)."

Hand chart + quote source:
Dermatoglyphics and Kabuki syndrome, A. Chudley



Hand chart for Kabuki syndrome by Niikawa (1988).
Hand chart source:
Kabuki make-up (Niikawa-Kuroki) syndrome: a study of 62 patients (1988);
Am J Med Genet, 1988 Nov; 31(3) p.565-89; authors: N. Niikawa, et al.




Prominent fetal finger pads in Kabuki syndrome.
Fetal finger pads in Kabuki syndrome, mentioned in both hand charts above (source: Kabuki syndrome mama); presence is characteristic but not universal: 88% (source: L. Armstrong et al, 2005).


Other significant hand signs (not reported inside the hand chart):

The palmar dermatoglyphics are very often (8 out of 12 individuals) featured with a radial loop on the hypothenar, and in about half of these cases (4 out of 12 individuals) this radial loop is formed throug the path of the a-line (source: N. Niikawa et all, 1982).

Kabuki syndrome is often featured with the missing of distal interphalangeal creases [DIP/IPD] of the 4th digit (50%) or 3rd digit (10%) - see e.g. the 4th digit in the 2nd hand chart displayed above; this feature is also often featured with limitation of movement (source info + picture below: C. Michot et al., 2013).

Missing interphalangeal distal creases in Kabuki syndrome.
Attenuation of the IPD creases of third and fourth fingers in KS patients in a) patient NCK020 at 16 months and 10 years of age, b) Attenuation and/or congenital absence of the IPD creases of third and fourth fingers in patient LAR003 at 3 years and 11 years of age, and c) in patient TOU002 at 6 years 1/2 and 24 years of age.


Also, Kabuki syndrome is often (67%) featured with curved fifth fingers [clinodactyly] (source: Genetics Home Reference), short fifth fingers [brachydactyly], and/or abnormal short middle phalange in the fifth finger [brachymesophalangy] (source: L. Armstrong et al, 2005). Ulnar deviation of fingers is sometimes also present (source: SpecialChild).

Short little finger in Kabuki syndrome.
Short little finger [pinky] in Kabuki syndrome
(source: Dermatology Online Journal).


All significant hand signs listed above for Kabuki syndrome together cover five out of the nine perspectives of the hand as defined according Multi-Perspective Hand Reading (including hand level 2, 5, 6, 8 & 9).

A summary of the most significant hand sign combinations in Kabuki make-up syndrome is described here:

Decoding the language of the hand:
hand sign combinations in Kabuki syndrome!





Hand charts are available for many other diagnostic issues;
start browsing HERE


Martijn van Mensvoort - Hand Research

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